GAHOLLYWOODKISS.com -
these are moments in History that mean something to me. (or not!)...                 ...gahollywoodkiss.com24 Nov 2015
 
 
**days until:
  
My 53rd: today...

Thanksgiving: is today

Christmas: 31
 
 New Years Eve:  38
 
.................................
 
a very special
'Birthday wish'
 
courtesy of GAHOLLYWOODKISS .com:
 
Happy Birthday...                                                             ...gahollywoodkiss.com 
Happy
 
'26th'
 
Birthday
 
 Sarah Hyland
 *actress, producer, soundtrack...

 
**21st, 29th, 30th, 40th, 50th, & 75th are priorities...
 
.................................
 
the World:
 
1999
 
Ferry sinks in Yellow Sea, killing hundreds
 
A ferry sinks in the Yellow Sea off the coast of China, 
killing hundreds of people on this day in 1999. 

The ship had caught fire while in the midst of a storm, 
and nearly everyone on board perished, 
including the captain...

.................................
 
United States:
 
1963
 
Jack Ruby kills Lee Harvey Oswald

At 12:20 p.m., 
in the basement of the Dallas police station, 
Lee Harvey Oswald, 
the alleged assassin of President John F. Kennedy, 
is shot to death by Jack Ruby, a Dallas nightclub owner.

On November 22, 
President Kennedy was fatally shot while riding in 
an open-car motorcade through the streets of downtown Dallas. 

Less than an hour after the shooting, 
Lee Harvey Oswald killed a policeman who questioned him 
on the street. 

Thirty minutes after that, 
he was arrested in a movie theater by police. 

Oswald was formally arraigned on November 23, 
for the murders of President Kennedy and Officer J.D. Tippit... 

.................................
 
Sports:
 
1960
 
Wilt Chamberlain sets NBA rebounds record
 
On November 24, 1960, 
Philadelphia Warrior Wilt Chamberlain, 
snags 55 rebounds in a game against the Boston Celtics, 
and sets an NBA record for the most rebounds in a single game...

.................................
 
Entertainment:
 
1947

“Hollywood 10″ cited for contempt 
of Congress

The House of Representatives votes 346 to 17 to approve citations of contempt against 10 Hollywood writers, directors, and producers. 

These men had refused to cooperate at hearings dealing 
with communism in the movie industry held by 
the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). 

 The “Hollywood 10,” 
as the men were known, 
are sentenced to one year in jail. 

 The Supreme Court later upheld the contempt charges.

The contempt charges stemmed from the refusal of the 10 men 
to answer questions posed by HUAC, 
as to whether they were or had ever been members 
of the Communist Party. 

 In hearings that often exploded with rancor, 
the men denounced the questions as violations 
of their First Amendment rights. 

 Albert Maltz, Dalton Trumbo, John Howard Lawson, Samuel Ornitz, 
Ring Lardner, Jr., Lester Cole, Alvah Bessie, Herbert Biberman, 
Edward Dmytryk, and Robert Adrian Scott, 
were thereupon charged with contempt of Congress. 

 The chairman of HUAC, J. Parnell Thomas, 
dismissed the arguments raised by the men, 
claiming that Congress had every right to ask people 
what their political affiliations were. 

 “The Constitution,” he declared, 
“was never intended to cloak or shield those who would destroy it.” 

 The Hollywood 10 responded with a joint statement in which 
they argued that HUAC had succeeded in having 
“the Congress cite the Bill of Rights for contempt.” 

 “The United States,” the statement concluded, 
“can keep its constitutional liberties or it can keep 
the Thomas committee. 
 It can’t keep both.

”The impact of the charges against the Hollywood 10 was immediate, 
and long-lasting. 
 Hollywood quickly established the so-called “blacklist,” 
a collection of names of Hollywood personalities 
suspected of having communist ties. 
 Those on the list rarely found work in the movies. 

 The contempt charges also created a chilling effect 
on the Hollywood film industry, 
and producers, directors, and writers shied away from 
subject matter that might be considered the least bit controversial, 
or open them up to charges of being soft on communism. 

 The blacklist was not completely broken until the 1960s...

.................................
 
G. A. Kiss-tory:
 
1963

Albany, Ca;
 
53 years ago today,
I was born...

.................................
 
Other Info:
 
1971
 
Hijacker parachutes into thunderstorm
 
A hijacker calling himself D.B. Cooper, 
parachutes from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727, 
into a raging thunderstorm over Washington State. 

He had $200,000 in ransom money in his possession.

Cooper had commandeered the aircraft shortly after takeoff, 
showing a flight attendant something that looked like a bomb, 
and informing the crew that he wanted $200,000, 
four parachutes, and “no funny stuff.” 

 The plane landed at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, 
where authorities met Cooper’s demands and evacuated 
most of the passengers. 

Cooper then demanded that the plane fly toward Mexico at a low altitude, and ordered the remaining crew into the cockpit.

At 8:13 p.m., 
as the plane flew over the Lewis River in southwest Washington, 
the plane’s pressure gauge recorded Cooper’s jump from the aircraft. 

Wearing only wraparound sunglasses, a thin suit, and a raincoat, 
Cooper parachuted into a thunderstorm with winds in excess 
of 100 mph and temperatures well below zero, 
at the 10,000-foot altitude where he began his fall. 

The storm prevented an immediate capture, 
and most authorities assumed he was killed during 
his apparently suicidal jump. 

No trace of Cooper was found during a massive search.

In 1980, 
an eight-year-old boy uncovered a stack of nearly $5,880 
of the ransom money in the sands along the north bank 
of the Columbia River, five miles from Vancouver, Washington. 

The fate of Cooper still remains a mystery...

.................................
 
 
 --------------------------------------------------------
 
*PERSONAL INFORMATION ONLY...

Copyright © 2016 by G. A. KISS

All rights reserved.



GAHOLLYWOODKISS.com
today is 'already' history...                     gahollywoodkiss.com
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint